Outreach
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Community Outreach

Condom Outreach Programs

 

 

Condom outreach programs can be cost-effective structural interventions that provide communities with the resources they need to prevent the spread of HIV. Keeping condom outreach as part of HIV testing outreach programs or community level interventions can promote both condom use and other risk reduction behaviors.

 

HIPAtlanta's Condom Outreach has four primary objectives:

 

  1. Condom availability in disenfranchised communities.
  2. Linking person living with HIV into medical care
  3. Branding campaign message “Texting Us Is Helping Us!”
  4. Creating new jobs and community service opportunities.

HIPAtlanta's Condom Outreach has four primary objectives:

 

  1. Condom availability in disenfranchised communities.
  2. Linking person living with HIV into medical care
  3. Branding campaign message “Texting Us Is Helping Us!”
  4. Creating new jobs and community service opportunities.

 

Making condoms widely available is integral to successful HIV prevention. Condom outreach programs have been shown to increase condom availability and use among a wide range of populations, including youth and adult males, commercial sex workers, and those who engage in risky sexual activities.

 

Outreach efforts for HIV prevention activities provide access to hard-to-reach populations at high risk for HIV. Bringing HIV prevention counseling, testing, referral and linkage to care to these outreach sites through the use of mobile vans and rapid HIV tests designed for whole blood and oral fluid has helped to increase knowledge of HIV status among many groups.

 

During 2004--2006, CDC funded demonstration projects to provide rapid HIV testing and referral to medical care. The projects targeted racial/ethnic minority populations and others at high risk in outreach and other community settings. The results demonstrated that rapid HIV testing in outreach and other community settings can identify large numbers of HIV infected persons in racial/ethnic minority populations, as well as others at high risk and who are unaware that they are infected with HIV (MMWR November, 2007).

 

An effective condom outreach program can change the way a community thinks about and engages in safe sex behavior. To achieve that goal, condom outreach programs should strive to make condoms available, accessible, and acceptable.

Social Media Outreach

Whether it’s getting tested, living with HIV/AIDS, succeeding at home and work or elevating our voice for policy change, we all have various social networks connecting us to others but never mixing them together. This is even more a reality with high risk groups and persons living with HIV.

 

In CDC’s Social Networks Demonstration Program (2003 – 2005), social network strategies were used to identify people who were unaware of their HIV infection in communities of color. Across nine sites funded for the program, approximately 6% of people tested were newly diagnosed with HIV (4). This prevalence rate is six times higher than the average of most HIV CTR programs, illustrating the great value of using social networks to reach people at risk for HIV infection.

THE SCIENCE

Epidemiologic studies that compare rates of HIV infection between condom users and nonusers who have HIV-infected sex partners demonstrate that consistent condom use is highly effective in preventing transmission of HIV. Similarly, epidemiologic studies have shown that condom use reduces the risk of many other STDs. However, the exact magnitude of protection has been difficult to quantify because of numerous methodological challenges inherent in studying private behaviors that cannot be directly observed or measured.

 

Theoretical and empirical basis for protection: Condoms can be expected to provide different levels of protection for various STDs, depending on differences in how the diseases or infections are transmitted. Male condoms may not cover all infected areas or areas that could become infected. Thus, they are likely to provide greater protection against STDs that are transmitted only by genital fluids (STDs such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis, and HIV infection) than against infections that are transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact, which may or may not infect areas covered by a condom (STDs such as genital herpes, human papillomavirus [HPV] infection, syphilis, and chancroid).

Three "A's"

for Condom Outreach Program Success

 

Available

Ensure that condoms are available in the environment where members of the target population are found, such as pharmacies, condom dispensing machines, and outreach workers.

 

Accessible

Ensure unrestricted access to condoms that are available in the environment by providing free condoms that are conveniently located in multiple locations.

 

Acceptable

Ensure that the norms within a community support the use of condoms and that the types are acceptable to community members by producing products that are popular and supported by local leaders and public figures.

 

Research and Development Blankenship, K.M., Bray, S.J., & Merson M.H. (2000)."Structural Interventions in Public Health." AIDS, 14:S11-21.Charania, M.R, et al., "Efficacy of Structural-Level Condom OutreachInterventions: A Meta-Analysis of U.S. and International Studies,1998-2007." AIDS Behav (2011) 15:1283-1297. Duncan, Ted and Charles Collins. (2011) "Condom Outreach Programs as Structural Interventions." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division ofHIV/AIDS Prevention, a Presentation

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